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BRITISH SANDWICH WEEK: 20 FUN FACTS ABOUT SANDWICHES

British Sandwich Week is underway, and everyone here at the Red Bus Cartridges HQ couldn’t be happier.

Sandwiches are without doubt the most popular lunch option for those living in the UK, so we thought it was time to share some wisdom through 20 fun facts, which you can find below…

And don’t forget, to celebrate British Sandwich Week, we have an amazing competition for you. To be in with a chance of winning a £15 M&S voucher, simply head to our Twitter page and enter.

1.The sandwich is named after John Montagu, the 4th Earl of Sandwich, who frequently ordered meat between two slices of bread when he was too busy for lunch.

2. In fact, Hawaii also used to be named after him too. That’s right, Hawaii was formerly known as the Sandwich Islands.

3. Around 12 billion sandwiches are eaten every year in the UK, with Brits spending a whopping £7.5bn on sandwiches during those 12 months.

4. The average sandwich contains 400 calories, meaning it takes a four mile run just to burn one off.

5. The most expensive sandwich in history was sold for the equivalent of £17,000 back in 2004. Why was it so expensive? Because it appeared to have in image of the Virgin Mary on it.

6. In America, more than three million sandwiches are eaten every day.

7. The average American eats 1,500 peanut butter and jelly sandwiches by the time they graduate from High School.

8. However, when it comes to sandwich fillings in the US, peanut butter and jelly isn’t the most popular. That title goes to the plain ham sandwich.

9. There is a town in Kent named Sandwich. However, the town has no direct connection with its bready namesake.

10. The world has been eating bread, or some baked combination of flour and water since 10,000BC.

11. Along with British Sandwich Week, there is also a day, every year where the sandwiches are celebrated over in the America. In case you were wondering, November 3rd is National Sandwich Day across the pond.

12. There are 11 Guinness World Records relating to sandwiches. 

13. One of these is the fastest time to make a sandwich with your feet. Texan, Rob Williams currently holds the record after making one in under two minutes, using only his feet.

14. On average, men in the UK eat around 110 grams of bread every day.

15. Women in the UK eat slightly less bread on a daily basis – around 75 grams a day.

16. Amazingly, six chicken sandwiches are consumed in the UK every second.

17. A bacon sandwich can actually cure a hangover – that’s according to researchers at Newcastle University.

18. When it comes to national sandwiches, Portugal’s may just be the most indulgent. It contains steak, ham, cheese and two types of sausage. It is then covered in melted cheese and beer sauce just before being served. Yum.

19. A fan of mayonnaise in your sandwich? It might alarm you to hear that the mayonnaise alone is accountable for 30-60% of the calories in that sandwich.

20. To eat the amount of bread produced from just one bushel of wheat, you would need to eat a sandwich for breakfast, lunch and dinner for 168 days.

NATIONAL STATIONERY WEEK

National Stationery Week is upon is, with April 24-30 marking this year’s celebration of writing and office materials.

Below, we have complied a list of 20 fun facts about stationery. As ever, feel free to share your opinions over on our Facebook and Twitter pages.

1. An average sized pine tree can make just over 80,000 sheets of paper.

2. Before erasers were invented in 1770, the preferred method for removing pencil was actually stale bread.

3. The world’s first pencil was invented way back in 1565.

4. The average office worker handles around 10,000 sheets of paper per year.

5. Pencil leads actually contain no lead whatsoever – just graphite and clay

6. The Egyptians invented scissors back in 1500BC.

7. In the UK, around 45 million printer cartridges are send to landfill every year.

8. During the Second World War, paper clips were used to help fight the Nazis.

Norwegian resistance members wore paper clips on their lapels as a discreet sign to show that they were fighting Hitler’s men.

9. Talking of World War II, this was also where ballpoint pens rose to fame. The Royal Air Force needed an alternative to the fountain pen as it couldn’t handle high levels of altitude without leaking.

10. The average ballpoint pen can draw a line two miles long.

11. However, a typical lead pencil can draw one that is 35 miles long – providing you sharpen it every now and then, of course.

12. Pencils can write in zero gravity and while underwater.

13. The first known stapler was made for King Louis XV of France in the 18th century.

14. Joseph Priestley, the man who discovered oxygen, also helped to invent erasers.

15. The Fulgor Nocturnus is the most expensive pen in the history of the world. Decorated with 945 black diamonds, the pen sold for the equivalent of£6.2mat a Shanghai auction back in 2010.

16. 2,500 pencils can be made from one average sized tree.

17. The word ‘pen’ comes from an old French word for the tail feather or long wing of a bird.

18. Pencils didn’t have rubbers attached to the end of them until around 100 years ago. This was due to teachers feeling as though they would encourage students to make errors.

19. Talking of which, the metal band that now attaches a pencil to a rubber is called a ferrule.

20. Mick Clay invented the drawing pin back in 1903. Sadly, that didn’t stop him from living in poverty as shortly after, he sold the invention.

Article written by Calum Chinchen – Social Media Executive at Red Bus Cartridges163, Beaconside, South Shields, Tyne and Wear, NE34 7PT163, Beaconside, South Shields, Tyne and Wear, NE34 7PT

NATIONAL TEA DAY

Just five days after UK Coffee Week ended, it is now time for tea to take centre stage. April 21st is National Tea Day and as we gave you 15 interesting facts about coffee last week, we only though that it was fair to do the same with our beloved tea!

1. Tea was discovered in China back in 2737BC, when an Emperor reportedly found that tea leaves accidentally fallen in his hot water.

2. All tea (other than herbal) is made from the ‘Camellia Sinensis’ plant.

3. When served without milk and sugar, tea contains no calories and has only half as much caffeine as an equal sized serving of coffee.

4. The average tea drinker consumes three cups per day.

5. The UK imports and consumes 140,000 tonnes of tea every year.

6. Between us here in the UK, we drink a staggering 62 billion cups us every year.

7. However, we are not the biggest tea drinkers in the world – that title goes to the United Arab Emirates.

8. According to a recent survey, 98% of tea drinkers add milk - but only 35% add sugar.

9. Some forms of tea has been proven to prevent cancer and cardiovascular disease.

10. Iced tea was first served during a heatwave at the St Louis World Fair in 1904.

11. Of all the tea variations in the world, green tea is said to have the best health benefits.

12. The most expensive tea in the world is grown in the Sichuan province of China. This tea costs the equivalent of around £155 for a small cup.

13. Although coffee is their main beverage, Americans gulp over 50 billion cups of tea every year.

14. Because of the high levels of antioxidants in tea, you are unlikely to have the same caffeine highs and lows that you will get after drinking coffee. This is because the antioxidants regulate the body’s absorption of the caffeine.

15. Until the Second World War, bricks of tea were used as a form of currency in Siberia.

Don’t forget to vote in our National Tea Day polls on Twitter and Facebook

Article written by Calum Chinchen – Social Media Executive at Red Bus Cartridges163, Beaconside, South Shields, Tyne and Wear, NE34 7PT163, Beaconside, South Shields, Tyne and Wear, NE34 7PT

 

UK COFFEE WEEK

April 10-16 is UK Coffee Week and to mark the occasion, we have provided you with a list of 15 interesting facts about the world’s most popular hot beverage.

1. Approximately 2.25 billion cups of coffee are consumed around the world on a daily basis.

2. Coffee is now more popular in the UK than tea. That’s right, according to a recent report, Brits spend 60% more on coffee than they do tea. Wowzers.

3. In the UK, people between the ages of 50 and 64 are the most likely to consume and spend money on coffee.

4. Coffee is also hugely popular across the pond with 54% of Americans drinking at least one cup on a daily basis.

5. On that note, the average American spends a whopping $1092 on coffee per year.

6. You are most receptive to the effects of caffeine between 9.30am and 11.30am, with 10.30am being the ideal time to consume a cup of coffee.

7. Contrary to belief, energy drinks still don't have as much caffeine as the coffee sold in chain outlets such as Starbucks and Costa.

8. Black Ivory coffee is the most expensive in the world. But guess what? It’s actually made from elephant dung!

9. According to a study back in 2013, drinking a cup of caffeinated coffee can significantly improve blood flow.

10. The term ‘Americano’ comes from World War II. Government Issued soldiers from the US would order an Espresso before diluting it with hot water.

11. Unless consumed in very large quantities, coffee doesn’t actually dehydrate you.

12. Coffee is the second most traded commodity in the word, with oil being the first.

13. Brazil is the largest producer of coffee in the world, and has been so for the last 150 years.

14. George Washington invented coffee - but not that one! A Belgian man living in Guatemala by the same name invented it way back in 1906.

15. Coffee has been found to reverse the liver damage caused by alcohol. And before you ask - no, this doesn’t mean Irish coffees are healthy!

Remember to share your opinions with us over on our Facebook and Twitter pages.

Article written by Calum Chinchen – Social Media Executive at Red Bus Cartridges163, Beaconside, South Shields, Tyne and Wear, NE34 7PT163, Beaconside, South Shields, Tyne and Wear, NE34 7PT